Mexican Breakfast Omelette

Designed to be a bit lighter on the flavor and fatty side for breakfast, I started making this Mexican Breakfast Omelette right after discovering Chorizo. It was a natural fit. Chorizo softened by lean ground beef, eggs, garlic, onions, cheddar, sour cream, salsa... need I say more?

 

Mexican Breakfast Omelette

Designed to be a bit lighter on the flavor and fatty side for breakfast, I started making this Mexican Breakfast Omelette right after discovering Chorizo. It was a natural fit. Chorizo softened by ground beef, eggs, garlic, onions, cheddar, sour cream, salsa... need I say more? 

Course Breakfast
Cuisine Barbar, Mexican
Keyword mexican, omelette
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 1 person
Author Mom

Ingredients

  • 1/8 Cup Chorizo (cooked)
  • 1/8 Cup 90/10 Ground Beef (cooked)
  • 3 Eggland's Best Eggs or farm-fresh
  • 1/4 tsp Granulated Buillion (Right around 1/4 to 1/3 bullion cube)
  • 1/8 tsp Granulated Garlic
  • 1/4 tsp Powdered Onion
  • 1/2 Tbsp Dried Minced Onion
  • Custom-sized Splotch Sour Cream
  • Custom-sized Splotch Fresh Salsa
  • Dribble Chopped Green Onions if you want

Instructions

  1. In a bowl, add eggs, bullion, granulated garlic, powdered onion, and dried minced onion. Whisk with a whisk or fork until blended well. Set aside.

  2. Heat an 8" or 10" heavy skillet (non-stick or cast-iron) on medium heat. If your chorizo and beef haven't been saute'd yet, cook them now.  

    If the meats have already been cooked, while the pan is heating, toss in cooked chorizo and ground beef. Arrange in them across the pan scattered and speckled evenly, so that when you put your eggs in you won't have to rearrange them. Since I'm a veteran at making this, this is actually where I mix the eggs with other ingredients, so once you get used to it, do it here instead of first.

  3. When the meat begins to sizzle and loose some of its oils, gently pour the egg mixture on top. Sprinkle the cheese on top, and press the shreds into the egg to submerge them. OR... if you're making an omelette, you can add the cheese to your omelette right after you flipped it over. Your choice.

  4. This is where you decide if you want a scramble or an omelette. 

    If you want a scramble, Every few seconds, use your spatula to push opposing ends of the egg from the edge inward to the middle, tip the skillet to drain still-liquid egg into the open space you just created. Continue doing this until you have a mound of moist egg in the center of your pan and no more liquid egg to run-off to the edges. At the point, flip the whole mass over. If you like your eggs runny, let it sit for only about 5 seconds. If you like them firm, let it sit for about 30 seconds. Slide your eggs onto a plate and move-on to the next step.

    If you want an omelette, cover your pan with a lid and check on your eggs about every 30 seconds. When your omelette looks puffy and somewhat dry on top, flip it over and let it cook only about 10 more seconds. If you haven't added your cheese yet, dump it into the center of the top of the omelette, spread it quickly nearly edge to edge, and cover with the lid again. This is a quick movement, as cheese will take longer to melt than your egg will take to finish cooking. Slidethe omelette onto a pan, and fold it over so the cheese is sandwiched between the two halve. Move on to the next step.

  5. Add your toppings. I add sour cream first, then salsa, then onion. This step is purely a matter of taste.  Go eat. <3 

Quick background about where this recipe came from, and how it's used

Designed to be a bit lighter on the flavor and fatty side for breakfast, I started making this Mexican Breakfast Omelette right after discovering Chorizo. It was a natural fit. Turns out, it was an almost identical match to a breakfast burrito I'd been ordering from Bob Evans for the last 15 years. Total favorite, now here at home.

For all my observations of Ohio and it's disconnect with authentic Mexican food, ya gotta score a big one to the Bob Evans of old (pre-takeover). They had their Mexican Omelette dead-on, clearly made with authentic Mexican sausage, and fittingly so as the Sausage King Bob Evans has been in American restaurant history. Alas, while the future of Bob Evans is questionable as an All-American down-home cooking king (the corporate takeover has left a literal bitter taste in my mouth), the taste I know and love is here, sizzling in my own skillet at home. What joy. 🙂 Chorizo softened by ground beef, eggs, garlic, onions, cheddar, sour cream, salsa... need I say more?